Medical Patient History

for Stroke Patients

According to the WHO, nearly 15 million people suffer a stroke (apoplex) each year. A common consequence is an impaired gait.
The N.A.P.® Gait Classification divides stroke patients into four basic gait types. The Medical Patient History for Stroke Patients is aimed at this classification. The "Concept for the Orthotic Treatment of the Lower Extremity following a Cerebral Vascular Accident" was written in close cooperation with the physiotherapist Renata Horst. You will find detailed information about this concept in our Stroke Guide. N.A.P.® is a registered trademark of Renata Horst.

 Body Weight and Height

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Body Weight
Determine the body weight. Foreseeable changes, like a weight gain due to growth, should be taken into consideration.

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Body Height
Determine the body height. Foreseeable changes, like a change in height due to growth, should be taken into consideration.

 Activity Level

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Activity Level
Evaluate the activity level together with your patient while already taking foreseeable changes into consideration.

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1. Indoor Walker
The patient has the ability or the potential to make transfers and to move with an orthosis on even surfaces at low walking speed. Ambulation is possible for a very short distance and duration due to the physical condition of the patient.

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2. Restricted Outdoor Walker
The patient has the ability or the potential to move with an orthosis at low walking speed and is able to overcome small environmental obstacles such as curbs, single steps or uneven surfaces.

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3. Unrestricted Outdoor Walker
The patient has the ability or the potential to move at medium to high and also varying speed and to overcome most environmental obstacles. Additionally, the patient can walk on open terrain and perform professional, therapeutic and other activities which do not apply an above average mechanical load on the orthosis.

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4. Unrestricted Outdoor Walker with Especially High Demands
The patient has the ability or the potential to move with an orthosis like the unrestricted outdoor walker. Additionally, the increased functional demands can generate high impact loads, tension and/or deformation on the orthosis. These patients are mainly athletes and children.

 Gait Types According to the N.A.P.® Gait Classification

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Gait Type
Determine the patient's gait type according to the N.A.P.® Gait Classification.